Rivers and Revolutions

Rivers and Revolutions

Rivers and Revolutions is a semester long interdisciplinary and experiential program for students at Concord Carlisle High School.  Through the course of one semester, students focus on a series of topics such as rivers, revolutions, air, and love in order to explore how different academic disciplines provide different windows of understanding and illuminate different aspects of these topics.  Students are challenged to think in sophisticated ways, and, as they begin to make connections between perspectives they develop their creative capacities through hands-on and collaborative tasks that solidify their personal relationship with the material while reinforcing and documenting their learning.  Rivers and Revolutions is more than a class or a classroom, it’s a community. By consciously creating a culture of trust, collaboration and support between students and between teachers and students all members of the classroom (students and teachers alike) are free to take risks—to push themselves and in doing so to grow.

Learning Objectives

Rivers and Revolutions aims to create a learning community in which…

Students consider the holistic nature of knowledge as they synthesize their learning across disciplines to explore a common set of ideas. In doing so, they grow more adept at discovering connections and  learn how to ask better questions. Students develop their capacity to work with others towards a shared goal as they find their own voice and become more capable at receiving feedback and offering feedback to both students and faculty. Students strengthen their ability to think creatively and begin to get a clearer sense of who they are as a learners, so that they leave the program empowered to tackle the challenges – both academic and nonacademic – that inevitably lie ahead. Finally, we hope that students leave with not only the tools, but also the will, to leverage their learning in the program in the service of other individuals and organizations; that in essence, they might leave the program better prepared to shape the world in which we live.